Soil Respiration

Measurements of soil respiration – the intake and release of CO2 – are considered an indicator of biological activity and ecosystem carbon balance.  Soil CO2 flux measurements allow researchers to detect changes in decomposition of soil organic matter and predict climate change impacts. Using a diffusive regulation approach to measure soil respiration offers several benefits created by the lack of external moving parts, including reduced power consumption and the ability to function in harsh environments – even under snow pack!

Learn more…

 

Trace Gas Flux 

Trace gas flux – CO2, CH4, N2O – measurements have provided researchers with massive amounts of insight into ecosystems ranging from old growth forests to heavily managed agricultural fields. Chamber techniques are the most commonly used approach for measuring trace gas flux.  Traditional sampling methods are often time consuming and prone to error, however, automated methods both reduce sampling time and increase accuracy of soil gas flux measurements.

Learn more…

 

Aqueous CO2

Measurements of CO2 in aqueous environments are an important indicator of ecosystem health and for evaluating sources and sinks that comprise the carbon cycle.  Often researchers are frustrated by the expense, difficulty and risk of waterproofing probes. Using a compact waterproof CO2 concentration probe allows researchers to cost effectively take continuous measurements even in harsh environments.

Learn more…

 

Industrial Applications

Measurements of CO2 flux in Brownfields – abandoned urban properties due to perceived or actual contamination –  can be used as an indicator of contaminant degradation. CO2 flux is a continuous, non-evasive surface method that provides a cost effective alternative to traditional monitoring methods.

Learn more…