Our eosFD enjoying the beautiful waterfalls

At Eosense the Sales and Marketing team – Sarah and Jen – puts most of their effort into supporting customers and understanding the science behind our products. Jen and Sarah explain:

In our roles we’re expected to know the product’s specifications and internal workings so we are able to identify applications where Eosense products can be used. Our time is mostly spent behind computers communicating with customers to understand their needs, spending countless hours studying the biogeochemistry of soils, reading daily journals to catch global trends in climate change research and we occasionally get our of the office to attend world class conferences and promote our products. One thing that we don’t typically do is bring our products into the field and become field techs for the day, so here we go!

Our playground for the day – Shubie Park, Nova Scotia

Our eosFD is a standalone soil CO2 flux sensor known for the following features:

  • truly portable
  • zero spatial constraints
  • direct measurements
  • plug and play
  • low power
  • easy collection of data with its internal datalogger

We wanted to put those claims to the test and see just how easy it is to set up our eosFD in the field. We grabbed the user manual, looked through our field tips and tricks blog and started our packing list:

  • 3 collars
  • sledge
  • block of wood
  • GoalZero Yeti 150 battery
  • SSC power & data cable
  • DC+ power cable
  • notebook & pencil
  • field ready eosFD

We packed our bags and were on our way to Shubie Park, Nova Scotia!

Sales & Marketing heading out to the field

Upon arriving to the site we decided where we would install the collars and got right to work. Using the sledge and a piece of wood we installed the 3 collars with very little effort! While it is recommended that you leave the collars installed for 24 hours before testing, we left them in for about 45 mins to adjust to the environment due to time constraints.

Installing collar

 

A PVC collar inserted into the soil

After a short stroll in the park, we made our way back to the first collar and were ready to setup the eosFD. We grabbed the User Manual and followed the “Quick Start Guide”:

  • plugged the SSC power cable into the eosFD
  • plugged the DC+ power cable into the SSC cable and the battery
  • turned the battery on
  • waited for a three pulses – meaning it was working!

We did it!

We set the measurement frequency to 5 minutes and let the eosFD collect data for 30 minutes on each collar. We did the same for the remaining two collars.

Collecting data

That was it! We packed all of the equipment back into the car and headed back to the office. Upon arriving to the office we downloaded the eosLink-FD software and plugged the eosFD into a Windows computer.

eosLINK-FD

 

We hit “Collect Data”, copied the data into a Google sheet and made a quick plot. We were finished!

Our data – showing about a 2 micromole per meter squared per second CO2 flux from the sites in Shubie Park.

The eosFD definitely stood up to the “Plug and Play” test! It was very easy to transport through the park and take flux measurements. Due to the eosFD’s low power requirements, we had no issues with power. The eosFD’s membrane-based approach measures flux directly so we didn’t have to perform any complicated configuration when we moved to a new collar. Finally the internal data logger means that all you have to do is plug the eosFD into your computer when you get back to download the results of your hard day in the field.

Our eosFD taking a minute to enjoy the bird houses along the way!

Stepping away from our computers and phones for the day was a great change for us, the dogs at the dog park were extremely entertaining and the beautiful Nova Scotia scenery is always pleasant to enjoy. Now that we have shown how easy this system is to use, stay tuned as Sales and Marketing may be escaping the office more often for more field work!

Watch our very entertaining movie from our day in the field!

CONTACT US TODAY FOR A QUOTE

 

 

Lakes may function as either sinks or sources of CO2. Their response to climate change is uncertain, as we lack continuous data of lake CO2 efflux and its drivers. This is especially true in the littoral zone of lakes, which can be very dynamic from the continuous injection and remobilization of terrestrial nutrients. This study used high-frequency measurements of CO2 exchange during the ice-free season by prototype low-power floating Forced Diffusion (FD) autochambers.

[Journal]

Lakes have been recognized for their important role in the global carbon cycle and are thought to act as a net source of atmospheric CO2, contributing 1 Pg C yr−1 cumulatively. Here we present a study in which the Eosense eosFD CO2 flux sensor is used for the first time to capture high-resolution temporal variability in lake CO2 evasion.

[Blog]

This summer, researchers from the GeoBasis team at Aarhus University (Denmark) took six eosFD soil CO2 flux sensors to the Zackenberg Research Station in north-eastern Greenland to conduct continuous measurements of soil CO2 fluxes in the Cassiope heath. The following is our latest update from the team…

[Blog]

Presented at the American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting in New Orleans, LA (December 2017).

[Abstract]

Presented at the American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting in New Orleans, LA (December 2017).

[Abstract]

Presented at the American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting in New Orleans, LA (December 2017).

[Abstract]

eosFD chambers are left in place for long periods of time to measure soil CO2 fluxes continuously. Learn more about the impact of the chamber on the soil temperature and moisture during long term deployment.

[Application Note]

Presented at the American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting, San Francisco, CA, December 2015.

[Abstract]

Measurements of soil carbon dioxide efflux provide critical information on soil carbon balance. In light of increasing interest in monitoring carbon balance of northern soils, it is important that we develop new methodologies that are better suited to long-term, remote, and off-grid deployments. In this study, we describe a Forced Diffusion (FD) dynamic chamber, in which a gas permeable membrane passively regulates mixing of atmosphere and soil air in the chamber, in place of the active pumping system inside a regular dynamic efflux chamber system.

[Journal] [ResearchGate]

A better understanding of temporal and spatial variability of soil CO2 fluxes is essential to improve model predictions of soil effluxes. To accomplish that goal, high-frequency and long-term data sets for model development and validation are needed.

[Journal] [ResearchGate]

Presented at the American Geophysical Union, San Francisco, CA, Dec 2012 (using eosFD prototypes).

[Abstract (Not available)]

To help evaluate surface monitoring tools for Weyburn, it is important to establish ranges of natural variation, and signal to noise ratio (SNR) of MMV tools in their intended setting. This study took place at three sites, two of which were in the injection field. For six months, we measured parameters at various temporal scales from half-hourly (CO2 surface flux and meteorology), to monthly (soil gas CO2 and δ13CO2), to bi-monthly (soil gas CO142), to compare SNRs of promising MMV techniques for Weyburn.

[Journal] [ResearchGate]

A variety of chamber methodologies have been developed in an attempt to accurately measure the rate of soil CO2 respiration. However, the degree to which these methods perturb and misread the soil signal is poorly understood. Using a numerical three-dimensional (3D) soil-atmosphere diffusion model, we have undertaken a comprehensive and comparative study of existing static and dynamic chambers. Specifically, we are examining the 3D diffusion errors associated with each method and opportunities for correction.

[Journal] [ResearchGate]

The McMurdo Dry Valleys of Antarctica are home to unique soil microbial communities. Using a specially designed Forced Diffusion flux chamber, we logged the first year-round record of soil surface CO2 flux in Hidden Valley.

[Journal] [ResearchGate]

Presented at the American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting, San Francisco, CA, December 2015.

[Presentation]

Presented at the Arctic Net Annual Meeting. Vancouver, BC, December 2015 (Using eosFD prototypes).

[Abstract]

Learn more about running the eosFD from solar power.

[Application Note]

Detailed technical specifications for the eosFD.

[Technical Specifications]

Learn more about the eosFD including selected technical specifications.

[Brochure]

Eddy covariance (EC) is an established technique that measures carbon exchange across the terrestrial-atmospheric interface, and is used to evaluate climate- and management-driven changes to carbon cycling across landscapes. Measurements of soil respiration (RS) at the ground level may provide opportunities for rich information that may help in the interpretation of EC data and ecosystem carbon dynamics.

[Blog]

A set of eosFD chambers are enjoying their new home as part of a Mitacs-funded graduate internship, co-installed alongside existing automated soil respiration chambers at the Howland Forest in central Maine.

[Blog]

So, you’ve got a set of chambers and you want to measure greenhouse gas emissions such as CO2 flux from a site. Now what? You want to be able to accurately comment on C budget by quantifying the soil CO2 flux at a site, but there is an impressive (and daunting?) level of spatial and temporal variability in soil CO2 flux. Important questions arise: How many chambers do I need? Where do I place them? How often should I sample? First, it is important to consider the factors that influence soil CO2 emissions.

[Blog]

Presented at the American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting, San Francisco, CA, December 2016.

[Abstract]

Presented at the International Symposium on The Cryosphere in a Changing Climate (2017) hosted by Victoria University of Wellington.

[Eosense Blog]

Revisiting the partitioning of net ecosystem exchange of CO2 into photosynthesis and respiration
The partitioning of net ecosystem exchange of CO2 (NEE) into photosynthesis and respiration can be challenging and is often associated with assumptions that yield unknown amounts of uncertainty …

[Journal] [ResearchGate]

Dr. Kim and his collaborators are interested in understanding the controls on soil respiration in Arctic ecosystems to understand how these controls might affect the long term carbon balance of Arctic soils, especially considering global warming, which is projected to affect Arctic regions most.

[Blog]

Soil is a significant source of CO2 emission to the atmosphere, and this process is accelerating at high latitudes due to rapidly changing climates. To investigate the sensitivity of soil CO2 emissions.

[Journal] [ResearchGate]

Presented at the American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting, San Francisco, CA, December 2016.

[Presentation]

Learn more about partitioning ecosystem respiration and the eosFD deployment in Zackenberg, Greenland.

[Eosense Blog]