Lake CO2 Flux Estimates Using Floating eosFD’s

Lakes have been recognized for their important role in the global carbon cycle and are thought to act as a net source of atmospheric CO2, contributing 1 Pg C yr−1 cumulatively. Here we present a study in which the Eosense eosFD CO2 flux sensor is used for the first time to capture high-resolution temporal variability in lake CO2 evasion.

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Continuous CO2 fluxes in the Cassiope heath

This summer, researchers from the GeoBasis team at Aarhus University (Denmark) took six eosFD soil CO2 flux sensors to the Zackenberg Research Station in north-eastern Greenland to conduct continuous measurements of soil CO2 fluxes in the Cassiope heath. The following is our latest update from the team…

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Top 5 reasons EC researchers need to measure soil respiration

Eddy covariance (EC) is an established technique that measures carbon exchange across the terrestrial-atmospheric interface, and is used to evaluate climate- and management-driven changes to carbon cycling across landscapes. Measurements of soil respiration (RS) at the ground level may provide opportunities for rich information that may help in the interpretation of EC data and ecosystem carbon dynamics.

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Soil Flux and How to Deal with a Site’s Variability

So, you’ve got a set of chambers and you want to measure greenhouse gas emissions such as CO2 flux from a site. Now what? You want to be able to accurately comment on C budget by quantifying the soil CO2 flux at a site, but there is an impressive (and daunting?) level of spatial and temporal variability in soil CO2 flux. Important questions arise: How many chambers do I need? Where do I place them? How often should I sample? First, it is important to consider the factors that influence soil CO2 emissions.

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Monitoring Soil Flux in the Winter

Dr. Kim and his collaborators are interested in understanding the controls on soil respiration in Arctic ecosystems to understand how these controls might affect the long term carbon balance of Arctic soils, especially considering global warming, which is projected to affect Arctic regions most.

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